Places to Go

Caerhays Castle and Gardens

Nestled in a sheltered valley between Truro and St AustellCaerhays castle and gardens really makes the most of the beautiful coast of South Cornwall

With only a handful of gardeners to keep the lawns tidy, plants watered and flowers blooming, the gardens at Caerhays are an incredible feat of love and devotion to the Great Outdoors. This is the ideal place to let little ones run wild (safely) or take a romantic stroll along the quiet footpaths with your beau.

 The castle turret peeking out over the trees greets you as you head into the gardens.

The Caerhays site has existed since 1370 but the estate as we know it now was created in the 20th century. The ‘castle’ was built in the early 19th century and then restored. It was always intended to be a family home and plays host to the Williams family who bought the estate almost 150 years ago. The gardens were created at the turn of the 20th century, flourishing from the adventures of Victorian Plant Hunters who brought back a number of exotic plants from their journeys abroad.

 

I had the pleasure of touring the house before exploring the gardens. The house is beautiful, featuring architecture from John Nash who also designed parts of Buckingham Palace. Every step of the way there’s a new story to be told with a different object to look at. The most impressive section of the tour is a museum filled with historical artefacts and geological specimens from Cornwall and around the world. The tour took approximately an hour and is a good introduction to the history of the Caerhays estate. As you walk out into the gardens, you can almost imagine what this might have looked like and how the land has changed over time.

A couple walk through the sun-dappled pathways to explore the extensive gardens and estate at Caerhays. Everywhere you go on the estate there are plants and flowers. The entire estate is kept beautiful by a small team of gardeners. A pathway at the top of the garden leading to a quiet spot in the sunshine.

 

Stepping out into the gardens was glorious. On a sunny day the plants, flowers and trees really come to life. The colours glow where the light hits them. As I was there in May, the gardens were fairly quiet. Once you enter there are four paths to follow, all of different lengths, meaning that people disperse along the pathways so you can take a private turn around the estate with your other half or with the kids in tow. 

 

After exploring the gardens, head back to your car parked at the bottom of the estate to grab a swimsuit and go for a quick paddle on Porthluney beach. If you’ve come for the morning, you might want to pack a picnic for eating on the sand while the kids play in the waves.

 

Join the team at Caerhays for their end of season summer fete on Sunday 18th June. A perfect family day out to celebrate (it's also Father's Day).

A view of Porthluney beach from the front of Caerhays castle.

Caerhays Castle and Gardens are open from February to the middle of June each year. House tours run at set times throughout the day, changing with the season.

Take a look at our holiday homes near the Caerhays Estate.

More reading

The Magic of the Wishing Tree at Madron

The Magic of the Wishing Tree at Madron

The tradition of a Cloutie tree is a long one that is shrouded in the mystery of witchcraft, and this one even had a well.

Pub Philosophy 5 years ago Katie Chown
Family Holidays: Outdoor Cornwall with the kids

Family Holidays: Outdoor Cornwall with the kids

The great Cornish countryside is a veritable playground, crammed to bursting with adventures to be had. Photography by Annabel Elston

Things to do 8 months ago Sian Pickles
A shipwreck adventure on the coast of north Cornwall

A shipwreck adventure on the coast of north Cornwall

‘From Pentire Point to Hartland light, a watery grave by day and night’, so goes the local saying. It’s one of the UK’s most notorious stretches of coastline for shipwrecks...ripe for adventure.

Visitors' Book 4 years ago Ali Ray
Cornish Smugglers' Stories

Cornish Smugglers' Stories

No Cornish history lesson would be done justice without attention being turned to smugglers. Whether they were liberators, criminals, pirates or local heroes, they covered the Cornish coastline with their illicit trade and made history through their dealings.

Stories & Characters 1 year ago Lizzie H