What an amazing sun-trap. This garden is perfect for relaxing, whilst watching the more adventurous members of your party frolic in the paddling pool. All in complete seclusion.
Talk about a room with a view! What a stunning setting to enjoy any meal from.
What a pretty place to slink back and relax.
Light and airy open plan living areas which offer the most picturesque views all year round.
The kitchen-area leads into the ground floor bedroom,
Bedroom 1 offers an abundance of space, and with 'zip and link' beds it offers extra flexibility for all sleeping requirements.
Large and roomy en suite to Bedroom 1.
Stunning spiral staircase which takes you up to the master bedroom, down to the garden-room and out to the stunning walled rose garden.
Stairs leading into the master bedroom.
The master bedroom offers the height of luxury. With this beautiful six foot bed, you are guaranteed to be treated to an amazing night's sleep.
En suite to master bedroom, equipped with this eye-catching claw-foot bath. Perfect to sink into after a fun-filled day.
Looking down the stairs from the master bedroom.
Looking back at the cottage from the end of the garden.
The garden room is such a lovely place to relax and un-wind. Allowing you to enjoy the outside, from the comfort of being inside.
Ground floor cloakroom.
Your private car parking area is right next to the cottage.
Once parked up, follow this pretty pathway to access your dream holiday cottage.
At the top of the pathway, the front door is privately tucked away and well lit.
Let yourself in and prepare to be spoilt rotten.
Step into the cottage on the ground floor, which leads you straight into the glorious kitchen-area.
Another beautiful spot within the garden to sit back and relax in with a good book.
The flowers in bloom are simply stunning.
The rolling countryside views are fabulous.
The views in winter are equally as breath-taking.
The gardens are a array of wall to wall colour.
A delightful cream tea awaits your arrival.

Little Linhay

3730

7.2 miles NW of Totnes / Sleeps 4 + 2 cots*

7 Nights from £643 - £1398

The location of attractions is intended only as a guide. Distances are 'as the crow flies'.

Nearest pub

The White Hart Buckfastleigh (2 ¾ miles)

This is a great place to drop by. The stunning Exmoor National Park is on the doorstep so you can call in here for a well deserved pint or bar meal after your walk. The pub is traditional with real ale available.

Nearest beach

Hollicombe Beach (12 miles)

High red sandstone cliffs shelter this beach making it a real suntrap and good escape from the bustle of Torquay. However, the soft sandstone cliffs can be unstable, so the beach is sometimes closed due to landslips.

Nearest walk

Scorriton and Huntingdon Warren (2 ½ miles)

A variety of walks start from the Tradesman's Arms and you can choose from an easy four mile saunter to a six mile hard slog. Scorriton is on the eastern edge of Dartmoor and walks take in the lovely views and ancient monuments of the moors. Take a look at the Web site for routes.

Nearest town

Buckfastleigh (2 ¼ miles)

Is a small, quiet town surrounded by hills and meadows. Best known for nearby Buckfast Abbey (now famous for its honey and wine) and the South Devon Railway that runs along the River Dart to the market town of Totnes seven miles away. There is a strange mausoleum in the town churchyard which local legend says has black dogs howling and breathing fire around it - this was apparently the inspiration for Conan Doyle’s ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’.

Also nearby

Buckfast Abbey (1 ¾ miles)

Home to a Roman Catholic community of Benedictine Monks, Buckfast Abbey is a living monastery that is open to visitors. You can pick up some Buckfast Tonic Wine or handmade gifts in the Monastic Produce shop.

Rated 4 out of 5 stars
Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Ms Judge June 2011

A Wonderful Surprise

Visiting the Abbey and its grounds was a truly delightful experience. It is quiet, beautifully maintained and utterly tranquil - despite the large number of visitors. There is a remarkable sense of order and purpose about the place, and visitors take their place in the scheme of things rather than over-running it. I would recommend a visit to the shop selling products from monasteries and abbeys all over Europe. It was fascinating.

Rugglestone Inn (3 ¾ miles)

Come early to get a table - there aren’t many and this pub is very popular.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Pascoe June 2017

We ate here twice whilst staying in Widecombe -it's a 'proper' rural pub with an exceptionally friendly landlord and a good variety of guest ales and wine. The menu was really interesting and the meals were generous and well cooked. The pub itself is small, but there is also a larger streamside beer garden. Would highly recommend - always lots of locals here too, which speaks volumes.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

August 2009

Lovely old-fashioned homely pub by Widecombe in the Moor. Locally sourced food and real ales straight from the barrel.

Carpenters Arms (4 ½ miles)

Having recently undergone a big makeover, the Carpenters Arms is ready to welcome guests with warm hospitality and excellent home-cooked food. Bright, clean and cosy, the pub is very popular so booking ahead is advised.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Pascoe April 2010

Pretty and traditional 18th Century pub in an unspoilt little village. Popular with locals and visitors alike, good wholesome menu and friendly and attentive staff - plus a lovely log fire!

Greenway (13 miles)

Agatha Christie's holiday home nestles on a crook of the River Dart in a beautiful woodland garden that is home to such horticultural treasures as Monterey pines, eucalyptus, China roses, myrtle and Turkey oaks. For a magical experience that's also kind to the environment, travel there by boat. 'Green ways' ferries leave from Dartmouth, Brixham and Torquay. Following a major restoration project, The National Trust has re-opened the house to the public, where quirky collections of memorabillia offer a glimpse into the private life of the well-loved crime writer. For house opening times and an events list, please visit the Web site.

Rated 4 out of 5 stars
Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Dr Brown July 2014

The journey to the house by way of the National Trust ferry was enjoyable as was the walk back to Dartmouth along the Dart Valley Trail and ferry (higher or lower will do, the former is cheaper). Unfortunately the house itself was a little disappointing with an over cluttered interior that did not really tell any particular story. There were bits and pieces of interest but overall it seemed as though everything from different times and sources was put in that could be which detracted. The entry to the house is timed but we still felt that it was over-crowded and NT should consider making the house visits guided only. The walled gardens were good with a beautifully restored peach house providing a highlight.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

June 2013

Well worth a visit to this house, an effort to get there as you can't go by car unless you pre-book. It was a nice ride there in the boat but you would need good weather. Lovely spring flowers in the grounds. Cafe/restaurant disappointing as there were no main meal available.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Viv Chandler May 2012

Enjoyed by All

A lovely house in beautiful surroundings on the banks of the River Dart. Good to see the interiors haven't been messed around with and still look as if Agatha and her family have just popped out for a minute. I can see why she loved it so much and the gardens are a delight. Thoroughly enjoyed by all - including a 22 year old male! Well worth a visit but, if arriving by car, don't forget to pre-book a parking space.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Mrs Quigg November 2011

A lovely boat ride from Dartmouth, but overall the house was disappointing. A hotch potch interior and hard to believe it was inhabited up until 2004. All furniture pre-dates the turn of the last century. The children did enjoy completing their quiz sheets 'can you find' and I can really recommend the pasties in the coffee takeaway shop (not the main cafe).


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

March 2010

An inspirational place!

This beautiful house set in wonderful surrounding is well worth a visit. It is easy to see why Agatha Christie loved this place and penned a number of her novels here. The surrounding woodlands with views of the River Dart are superb. You can take a ferry from Dartmouth to get to Greenway but we chose to take the foot ferry from Dittisham (another charming little place). I would highly recommend a visit to this lovely area.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

March 2009

Visiting Greenway is a lovely way to spend the day, they also have occasional events so it is worth having a look before you go to see if any take your fancy. If you like gardens, I would recommend visiting Greenway as I thoroughly enjoyed it.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

November 2008

'The Loveliest Place in the World'

Agatha Christie was right to call this the 'loveliest place in the world'. Arriving by ferry is really the best way to see it. A stroll in the pretty woodland gardens followed by some delicious homemade food in the Barn Cafe, rounded off with the return trip on the ferry makes for a thoroughly enjoyable day out.

Dartmoor Otters and Buckfast Butterflies (2 ½ miles)

Two very different species living happily in one sanctuary. See butterflies emerging in tropical surroundings at the butterfly farm and gain an insight into the secret underwater life of otters as you watch them from specially constructed glass enclosures. Visit the shop for otter and butterfly gifts. There are also facilities for treating any sick or injured otters that are brought to the sanctuary.

Rated 4 out of 5 stars
Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Mrs Barber-Brown January 2014

Lovely for children at feeding time - even in winter

We visited both the otters and butterflies a few summers ago (pre children) and really enjoyed it, so were keen to take our children (age 4-5) there this winter. In winter the butterflies are sleeping so that part is closed, but we were delighted to have the otters almost to ourselves and a near-private tour from the keeper at feeding time with lots of fascinating information about otters, the sanctuary and the individual otters there. Although it's small, outdoors and can be muddy, it's brilliant to see and hear the otters and the children's faces lit up. Usually the steam trains next door would be a great follow-up activity to get lunch in Totnes, but they were unfortunately closed due to a landslip. Lunch at the House of Marbles not far away worked great instead.

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