The exterior of this beautiful cottage.
Welcome to this delightful cottage
The open plan living and dining is as cosy as can be
The garden is a sun-trap and ideal for al fresco dining.
Bedroom 1 has a comfy double bed and plenty of storage
The country kitchen has a lovely Aga creating a warm welcome all year round
Cooking up a holiday meal will be a treat
The toasty woodburner makes this a perfect reterat all year round
The cottage retains many of its original features with flagstone floors and rustic beams
French doors from the dining-area lead out to the enclosed garden.
The small study area.
The stylish shower-room on the ground floor.
Breakfast in bed?
The pretty twin bedroom.
The family bathroom is very spacious.
The lawned garden is ideal for al fresco dining or that glass of wine before supper.
Roughtor provides miles of walking and exploring.
The stunning north Cornwall coast is within easy reach
The beach at Daymer Bay.
Trebarwith Strand.
Padstow harbour.
Part of the beach at Widemouth Bay.

Chy Goff

1384

Camelford / Sleeps 4 + cot*

7 Nights from £398 - £915

The location of attractions is intended only as a guide. Distances are 'as the crow flies'.

Nearest pub

The Masons Arms (½ mile)

Cosy and traditional, The Masons Arms is nestled in the centre of Camelford and dates back to the 18th Century. Divided into a restaurant and separate bar, a wide range of hearty pub food is offered to all.

Nearest beach

Bossiney Beach (3 ¾ miles)

Joining up with Benoath Cove at low tide, Bossiney Beach sits a short distance from Tintagel. Also known as Bossiney Haven, Bossiney Beach is often overlooked and therefore relatively quiet. There is little by way of parking and the beach is not lifeguarded. Dogs are allowed year-round, great news for your four-legged friend.

Nearest walk

Camelford to Watergate (½ mile)

A five mile walk starting from Camelford car park and taking in pretty riverside views and woodland. Take a look at the iwalkcornwall.co.uk website for further details about this lovely walk or others in the area.

Nearest town

Camelford (½ mile)

Camelford is an ancient Cornish market town through which the Camel river runs on its way to the coast at Padstow. The town itself has a good selection of pubs, cafes and restaurants, but it is perhaps Camelford’s surroundings that are the real draw here. Walkers are in heaven when they venture just outside Camelford to explore the moorland and climb two of Cornwall’s highest points, the tors of Brown Willy and Rough Tor; an extinct volcano. For the less energetic, a stroll along the river banks through Enfield Park is a lovely way to spend an afternoon.

Also nearby

Peckish Fish & Chips (½ mile)

This is the place for the best takeaway fish and chips in the area. A range of burgers, pies and other takeaway foods also available.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Dare September 2012

Delicious!

Very high quality fish, just delicious and reasonable too.

Tintagel Castle (4 ¼ miles)

The remains of Tintagel Castle are at the heart of Arthurian legend. The location of the castle is spectacular – half a mile outside of Tintagel, across rugged clifftops, with no vehicular access. Tintagel Island, attached to the mainland by a sliver of land, enhances the wild and romantic atmosphere.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

David Brear October 2015

Take your time

Leave unsteady members of the family at the café while more active members tackle the many uneven, high, sometimes slippery steps (handrails are provided - use them!). Enjoy the excellent information centre which uses an innovative overhead projector to show the succeeding occupations of the site. There is a café and toilets, and a Land Rover to run you down and back if the walk down the valley isn't for you.
This is a uniquely precious historical site, the first to show how dark age Britain was actually still firmly connected to Mediterranean civilisation. Its legendary connection to king Arthur led to the construction of the Norman castle, but don't let the historical fiction mislead you - this is a real site where hundreds of people lived and traded for centuries at the edge of the Atlantic long before the Saxons took over Cornwall. The dramatic cliffs, the birds, the butterflies will all make this a day to remember.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

February 2014

Worth the climb!

A visit to Tintagel is a must when visiting this part of the world! The Castle has breathtaking views,but is a steep climb up to the top. The village has lots of friendly gift shops and good pubs to choose from.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

April 2012

Awesome. A must see and you can even take your dog up the cliffs and around the ruins.
Thank you English Heritage.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Harding April 2012

Nice but you must be fit

This is a lovely old ruin split between 2 cliffs. To access both involve very steep steps. You must be very fit but its a nice day out.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Lansley October 2011

Tintagel and Trebarwith Strand

Although we stayed an hour away it was really worth the visit. My second visit in 10 years and so nice to see nothing had changed. Extremely steep slopes to climb - good steps and rails to hang on to but no access for wheelchairs or disabled! You must go on a good sunny day to take advantage of the views around. Always windy and blowy there.

Trebarwith Strand is just around the corner and is so worth the visit as the rock formation to get the beach is really worth seeing. Very natural but again no real access for wheelchairs or disabled really.

Trebarwith Strand Beach (4 miles)

Made up of half a mile of soft, golden sand backed by rock and cliff, Trebarwith Strand is a National Trust-owned beach near Tintagel. Easily accessible, at low tide a huge expanse of sand is revealed whilst at high tide the sea covers nearly all the beach. Lifeguarded in summer, Trebarwith Strand is a popular spot amongst people of all ages.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Warrington May 2015

Trebarwith Strand

We walked along the cliff tops to discover this beautiful stretch of dog friendly beach. It is accessed by a rocky plateau but once on the beach there is a long stretch of golden sand with plenty of room for all to play. Lots of body boarding & surfing to be had with places to hire equipment. It's a lovely unspoilt area with a couple of cafes, tourist shops & a pub. Definitely worth a visit.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Wood September 2014

Fantastic beach

We were recommended Trebarwith Strand as one of the nicest beaches along this stretch of coastline. It was beautiful. We visited at lowtide, so lots of sandy beach available. The entry onto the beach is past a few cafes (we had an amazing cream tea in one of them = yum) and over a rocky area, before you reach the sand. The rocks themselves are fascinating. The beach is a good size, with rock pools and caves and plenty for all to explore. Some of the roads approaching Trebarwith are steep and narrow - as is often in this part of Cornwall.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

February 2014

Hidden Gem!

Found the beach by accident whilst staying at Port Isaac and visiting Tintagel.
Beautiful sandy beach,reached by clambering over rocks . Really nice Cafe serving burgers and chips etc. Wish we had time to return another day!

The Melia Family


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

The Ward Family January 2013

An absolute classic!

Trebarwith Strand lies at the end of a narrow lane that descends through a wooded valley to this beachside hamlet. A vast beach at Spring low tides, its only downside is at high tide it is reduced to a modest rocky plateau. Armed with a tide table, however, there is no excuse for at least 6 hours a day on this deeply charismatic beach. Surrounded by an impressive cliff-scape this beach offers caves, huge sand flats, streams and rock pools big enough for the kids to safely swim in. Great surf as well including surf hire and lessons.When the tide does gently nudge the family up onto the rocky plateau, lovely in its own right, there is always the Port William pub overlooking the beach or a variety of cafes and a couple of quirky gift shops to keep everyone entertained. This is also a great place to access the coastal path heading North East to Penhallic point and Tintagel castle or South West to Tregardock beach and Port Isaac. It can get busy in the high season but never on the Polzeath scale and out of season it is usually very peaceful.

Boscastle (4 ½ miles)

One of the few sheltered harbours on the north coast, Boscastle became famous in 2004 due to the devastating floods that swept through the village. The community has recovered remarkably well, and Boscastle is once more a thriving resort and a lovely village to visit.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Wood September 2014

Staying in Boscastle

Boscastle was a wonderful place to stay for our holiday. Good local shops, like the post office and Spar for provisions. We tried several pubs. The Napoleon, the Wellington (for Sunday lunch = yum) and the Old Manor house. I would recommend the Boscastle made ice-cream from a shop half way down the harbour walk on the left hand side as you walk towards the sea.
We thoroughly enjoyed sitting for ages, watching the blowhole in the harbour. It 'blow's about 1-1.5 hrs either side of low tide, and is amazing to watch, and listen to aswell.
There is a really enjoyable walk from the main car-park along the Valency river, which is flat, unless you decide to go up to Minster church, and that path is very steep.
We didn't rate the Tourist shops very highly, because everything was so expensive.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Hillman May 2013

Delightful place; harbour and old village up the hill. Fine coast walks to either Tintagel or Crackington Haven with options of bus connections. Also local valley/wood walks. Recommend Cobwebs pub at the harbour and The Napoleon up in the village. If self catering, the farm shop about half mile out of village towards Crackington Haven on B3263, is worth a visit.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Christie August 2011

Boscastle

Wonderful old harbour village - beautiful scenery can be seen from the headland which can be reached by two different paths, one on the right by the Harbour Light and one on the left. A tiny cove is also accessible where the blowhole can also be seen. Some lovely places to eat in Boscastle. We ate a lovely meal at the Cobweb Inn and also at the Riverside. We had cream teas and breakfast at the Harbour Light and Bridge Guest House, but the Riverside provided the best breakfast EVER. Some lovely shops such as the Mill and Things as well as an art gallery, fudge and Rock shop and 2 other fab gift shops. We love Boscastle and have been there many times. The Museum of Witchcraft also interesting. Visitor centre provides maps and info and also information about the flood and general history. Tintagel is 5 mins away and Crackington Haven about 10-15 mins drive as is Port Isaac. Padstow about 40 mins.

The Port William Inn (3 ¾ miles)

In a stunning setting, this pub offers wonderful views over Trebarwith Strand, excellent food and fine Cornish ales. A popular place for walkers, there is also a surf school nearby.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Young October 2013

A real gem.

We stumbled across the Port William at Trebarwith Strand one evening on our way back from Port Issac. When we arrived the sun was setting, the tide was high and the waves roaring! The pub sits on part of the cliff which looks over the bay of Trebarwith, offering stunning views of this part of the coastline. We had a drink whilst sat on one of the picnic benches outside and watched the sunset. Bliss! We then returned to the Port William for lunch later in our holiday and the food was very tasty 'pub grub'. The staff were very welcoming and the pub is child and dog friendly and our two sons enjoyed looking at the huge fish tank that resides in the main bar!


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

The Ward Family May 2013

An exceptional place to watch the sun set over Trebarwith Strand either with a pint of fine Cornish ale, glass of wine or a robust pub feast. Great food and a recently added contemporary extension to the dining area with outstanding sea views.

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