The view is simply stunning! Enjoying a spot of dining al fresco is a must in this glorious spot.
The master bedroom is a delightful place to relax after a full day of adventure.
The well-equipped kitchen.
The Cottage is such a sweet and welcoming retreat.
The wood-burner electric stove creates a warm and toasty ambience for those cosy nights in.
The views from the master bedroom are also magical.
The family shower-room is light and spacious.
The single room.
The sitting-area connects nicely to the bedrooms and links directly to the outside decking area.
Neatly tucked away in the corner you have a nice dining area to enjoy any meal.
The Cottage and its location offer such a welcoming and friendly environment.
Stunning views can be enjoyed as far as the eye can see from your very own private decking.
The enchanting Berry Pomeroy Castle is also within minutes from The Cottage and makes for a very memorable day out.
Compton Castle is breath-taking and is right on your doorstep. Definitely worth a visit.

The Cottage

4318

3.4 miles S of Newton Abbot / Sleeps 3 + cot

Book or Reserve Need more time? Reserve any cottage for up to 24 hours before booking

7 Nights from £351

The location of attractions is intended only as a guide. Distances are 'as the crow flies'.

Nearest pub

Church House Inn (1 ½ miles)

A Grade II-listed pub with a good reputation for food. A choice of dining areas, including the old village bakery (complete with original bread oven), the old cobblers or the converted hayloft. In 2012 the pub received the accolade of Devon Dining Pub of the Year by the Good Pub Guide.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

April 2011

Church House Inn, Marldon. Village pub with amazing food using lots of local ingredients. Always reliable with very friendly staff. Dogs welcome in Bar area or beautiful beer garden. Open every day for food and of course great beer and wine.

Nearest beach

Corbyn Head Beach (3 ½ miles)

Backed by brick-coloured cliffs and dotted with brightly coloured beach chalets, Corbyn Head Beach is a popular choice. Providing disabled access onto the beach and ample facilities, beach-goers of all ages will feel comfortable here. Hire a sunbed or find a patch of the beach's reddish sand and relax under the sunshine. A flag system is in place to guide swimmers and there is lifesaving equipment on hand. Seasonal dog restrictions are in place, so do check before bringing along your four-legged friend.

Nearest walk

Bradley Manor (3 miles)

A medieval manor house where you can visit rooms and gardens. Dogs are permitted in the meadows and woodland surrounding the manor and you'll also find riverside walks nearby.

Nearest town

Paignton (3 ½ miles)

Families have been flocking to Paignton for generations to enjoy a traditional English seaside resort. Much loved by the Victorians, the pleasures of Paignton have changed little – sand castle building, picnics on the beach and a dip in the sea. Paignton Zoo has a world-wide reputation for its conservational aims and offers an excellent day out for animal lovers; state-of-the-art enclosures afford the animals greater freedom to exhibit natural behaviour, which in turn makes for an exciting display for visitors.

Also nearby

Greenway (6 ¾ miles)

Agatha Christie's holiday home nestles on a crook of the River Dart in a beautiful woodland garden that is home to such horticultural treasures as Monterey pines, eucalyptus, China roses, myrtle and Turkey oaks. For a magical experience that's also kind to the environment, travel there by boat. 'Green ways' ferries leave from Dartmouth, Brixham and Torquay. Following a major restoration project, The National Trust has re-opened the house to the public, where quirky collections of memorabillia offer a glimpse into the private life of the well-loved crime writer. For house opening times and an events list, please visit the Web site.

Rated 4 out of 5 stars
Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Miss Waller August 2020

Beautiful!

Amazing grounds and lovely views of the Dart.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

October 2019

Lovely day out

This house is in the most beautiful spot, you could really imagine living there. The gardens are gorgeous and the walk beside the river is great for body and soul - look out for the resident seal!


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Mrs Pitty August 2019

Well worth a visit

The setting exquisite. Such lovely views. A walk to the boathouse a must. Trails for the children excellent.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Dr Brown July 2014

The journey to the house by way of the National Trust ferry was enjoyable as was the walk back to Dartmouth along the Dart Valley Trail and ferry (higher or lower will do, the former is cheaper). Unfortunately the house itself was a little disappointing with an over cluttered interior that did not really tell any particular story. There were bits and pieces of interest but overall it seemed as though everything from different times and sources was put in that could be which detracted. The entry to the house is timed but we still felt that it was over-crowded and NT should consider making the house visits guided only. The walled gardens were good with a beautifully restored peach house providing a highlight.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

June 2013

Well worth a visit to this house, an effort to get there as you can't go by car unless you pre-book. It was a nice ride there in the boat but you would need good weather. Lovely spring flowers in the grounds. Cafe/restaurant disappointing as there were no main meal available.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Viv Chandler May 2012

Enjoyed by All

A lovely house in beautiful surroundings on the banks of the River Dart. Good to see the interiors haven't been messed around with and still look as if Agatha and her family have just popped out for a minute. I can see why she loved it so much and the gardens are a delight. Thoroughly enjoyed by all - including a 22 year old male! Well worth a visit but, if arriving by car, don't forget to pre-book a parking space.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Mrs Quigg November 2011

A lovely boat ride from Dartmouth, but overall the house was disappointing. A hotch potch interior and hard to believe it was inhabited up until 2004. All furniture pre-dates the turn of the last century. The children did enjoy completing their quiz sheets 'can you find' and I can really recommend the pasties in the coffee takeaway shop (not the main cafe).


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

March 2010

An inspirational place!

This beautiful house set in wonderful surrounding is well worth a visit. It is easy to see why Agatha Christie loved this place and penned a number of her novels here. The surrounding woodlands with views of the River Dart are superb. You can take a ferry from Dartmouth to get to Greenway but we chose to take the foot ferry from Dittisham (another charming little place). I would highly recommend a visit to this lovely area.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

March 2009

Visiting Greenway is a lovely way to spend the day, they also have occasional events so it is worth having a look before you go to see if any take your fancy. If you like gardens, I would recommend visiting Greenway as I thoroughly enjoyed it.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

November 2008

'The Loveliest Place in the World'

Agatha Christie was right to call this the 'loveliest place in the world'. Arriving by ferry is really the best way to see it. A stroll in the pretty woodland gardens followed by some delicious homemade food in the Barn Cafe, rounded off with the return trip on the ferry makes for a thoroughly enjoyable day out.

Shaldon (6 miles)

Shaldon is an unspoilt village situated on the mouth of the river Teign between Torquay and Teignmouth. It has a thriving livelyhood based on the estuary. On a clear day, Portland Bill can even be seen despite being 50 miles away. A pretty village with two churches, a boutique, butcher, coffee shop and many conserved areas for all to enjoy.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Burgher June 2019

Shaldon

The London, The Ferry Boat and the Clifford all good pubs. The London Inn and The Clipper are the places to eat.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Barnett September 2016

Shaldon village

Lovely walk with our dog along the estuary into Shaldon village with a few shops/cafes. London Inn pub by the bowling green friendly pub with excellent beer and food (Best to book for Sunday lunch). If you don't like the Hi De Hi type holiday with amusements and cheap trinket shops then this is a place to visit


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Ms Richardson January 2014

Very English Shaldon

A little hidden gem this village right on the seafront facing Teignmouth on the estuary, nice stylish shops and narrow streets with a bowling green and several nice pubs with good food.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Miss Gilchrist October 2013

Lovely pretty village, with a host of beautiful places to eat and drink. We tried the live music at the Ferryboat Inn, and had a lovely early evening looking out over the harbour from their beer garden. The shops were good quality, though during the off-season (October) I presume they have shorter opening hours (10-4 average) and some appeared closed. Everyone we met was very friendly, and the atmosphere was relaxed and refined.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

January 2012

Fabulous estuary village

Complete with its full range of shops, restaurants/pubs and beachesSo much to see- the village has a great website.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

March 2009

Shaldon village life

Shaldon village hosts a variety of activities throughout the summer. There is a market on the village green in traditional costume every week and the well know water carnival where sand castle competitions and decorated boats abound. The highlight of the year has to be Shaldon Regatta, which takes place around the late summer bank holiday in August where everyone is welcome to enter and regatta boats are available if you don't have your own. Also five-a-side football, beach volleyball, swimming competitions and sandcastle competitions abound. Highly recommended.

Prickly Ball Farm and Hedgehog Hospital (2 ¼ miles)

Meet the rescued hedgehogs and the rest of the farm animals here - feed the lambs, walk the goats and ride and groom the ponies.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

September 2012

Dartmouth (9 miles)

Historically, Dartmouth was of strategic importance as a port used in the crusades of 1147 and 1190. Dominated by Britannia Royal Naval College, it has two fortified castles protecting the mouth of the River Dart. There are many historical buildings, a cobbled market place, shops, galleries, gourmet restaurants and delicatessens. National Trust Gardens, the South West Coast Path and clean beaches are nearby.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Baker October 2020

Dartmouth boat trip.

We loved Dartmouth. Use the park and ride bus down into the town, much easier than trying to park.
The one hour boat trip was very informative and we saw Seals.
Take the car ferry across the river and enjoy the scenery on the route back.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Miss Waller August 2020

Lovely!

Travelled there by steam train and then went out on the steam paddle ship. Lovely town and great day out.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Miss Waller August 2020

Lovely!

Travelled there by steam train and then went out on the steam paddle ship. Lovely town and great day out.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Pitty August 2019

Brilliant

So much to do. Beautiful harbour. Good shopping, great eateries. Lots of boating/kayaking opportunities.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Gage September 2012

Dartmouth

A bustling town with good shopping and art galleries and other galleries. If you want to park in Dartmouth town centre you will have to get there early or there is Park & Ride at the top of the town.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Clark April 2012

Dartmouth

Stunning location and very picturesque


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Simon Tregoning July 2008

A nice vibe

A bustling town with many good restaurants, some good shopping and a growing reputation for art galleries. Try tapas at Browns Hotel.

Berry Pomeroy Castle (3 miles)

Reputedly Devon's most haunted castle, Berry Pomeroy is secreted away in a steep wooded valley. The 15th century ruin still displays a wall painting of the Three Kings in its gatehouse chamber. The great Elizabethan mansion of the Seymours was intended to become the most spectacular house in Devon, a match for Longleat and Audley End, however, it was abandoned by 1700 and subsequently became the subject of many a chilling ghost story, some of which can be heard in the audio tour. To get a good view of the ruin from below, take the woodland walk, although this can be steep in parts.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

May 2011

Lovely secluded setting down a narrow winding one-car-only lane. Very interesting castle history - do take one of the little hand-held recordings round with you. Very good cafe too - had a lovely crab salad.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

September 2008

The ruins are brought to life with personal audio guides. Thoroughly recommended.

- Peter Reynolds

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