The Barn at Trelash is delightful.
The bedroom has a bespoke hand-made bed.
The bathroom has a fabulous double spa bath so you can indulge in bubbles of both kinds!
This is a perfect bolthole for two!
The modern, stylish kitchen.
The stairs provide a natural divide between the kitchen and dining areas, and the sitting-area.
Looking from the dining-area towards the sitting-area.
Plenty of room to chillout and relax in front of the wood-burning stove
Lovely details throughout.
The bedroom  is simply gorgeous.
Breakfast in bed...go on, you are on holiday!
The bathroom leads off from the landing.
The bathroom is fab wth a separate shower and a double jacuzzi bath!
A lovely spot to sit out at any time of the day.
The charming village of Port Isaac is well worth a visit.
The north coast is littered with fabulous beaches and terrific coastal walks.
The harbourside village of Boscastle.
Dramatic Bodmin Moor is a ramblers' paradise.

The Barn at Trelash

3862

5.7 miles E of Boscastle / Sleeps 2 (no children under 16)

7 Nights from £370 - £699

The location of attractions is intended only as a guide. Distances are 'as the crow flies'.

Nearest pub

St Tinney Arms (1 ¼ miles)

A traditional pub and restaurant with wooden beams and slate floors. Food is locally sourced where ever possible and there's a games room to keep the kids happy. Part of the St Tinney Farm complex, the pub only opens at certain times of year so give them a call before you visit.

Nearest beach

The Strangles Beach (4 ¾ miles)

The oddly-named Strangles Beach is made up of two sand and shingle beaches that join together at low tide. Framed by dramatic cliffs reaching up to 200 meters tall, the beach has a fairly difficult access route with a 20-30 minute walk from the car park and a steep cliff path. That said, the beach below is well worth the descent and provides a striking spot to sit and escape the everyday. The beach is popular with naturists.

Nearest walk

Crackington Haven Circular Walk (4 ¾ miles)

This is a challenging three and a half mile walk with varied terrain including steep hills, stiles and steps. The views alone from the cliff tops will make the effort worthwhile and the return journey takes in lovely woodland.

Nearest town

Boscastle (5 ¾ miles)

One of the few sheltered harbours on the north coast, Boscastle became famous in 2004 due to the devastating floods that swept through the village. The community has recovered remarkably well, and Boscastle is once more a thriving resort and a lovely village to visit.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Wood September 2014

Staying in Boscastle

Boscastle was a wonderful place to stay for our holiday. Good local shops, like the post office and Spar for provisions. We tried several pubs. The Napoleon, the Wellington (for Sunday lunch = yum) and the Old Manor house. I would recommend the Boscastle made ice-cream from a shop half way down the harbour walk on the left hand side as you walk towards the sea.
We thoroughly enjoyed sitting for ages, watching the blowhole in the harbour. It 'blow's about 1-1.5 hrs either side of low tide, and is amazing to watch, and listen to aswell.
There is a really enjoyable walk from the main car-park along the Valency river, which is flat, unless you decide to go up to Minster church, and that path is very steep.
We didn't rate the Tourist shops very highly, because everything was so expensive.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Hillman May 2013

Delightful place; harbour and old village up the hill. Fine coast walks to either Tintagel or Crackington Haven with options of bus connections. Also local valley/wood walks. Recommend Cobwebs pub at the harbour and The Napoleon up in the village. If self catering, the farm shop about half mile out of village towards Crackington Haven on B3263, is worth a visit.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Christie August 2011

Boscastle

Wonderful old harbour village - beautiful scenery can be seen from the headland which can be reached by two different paths, one on the right by the Harbour Light and one on the left. A tiny cove is also accessible where the blowhole can also be seen. Some lovely places to eat in Boscastle. We ate a lovely meal at the Cobweb Inn and also at the Riverside. We had cream teas and breakfast at the Harbour Light and Bridge Guest House, but the Riverside provided the best breakfast EVER. Some lovely shops such as the Mill and Things as well as an art gallery, fudge and Rock shop and 2 other fab gift shops. We love Boscastle and have been there many times. The Museum of Witchcraft also interesting. Visitor centre provides maps and info and also information about the flood and general history. Tintagel is 5 mins away and Crackington Haven about 10-15 mins drive as is Port Isaac. Padstow about 40 mins.

Also nearby

Tintagel Castle (8 ¼ miles)

The remains of Tintagel Castle are at the heart of Arthurian legend. The location of the castle is spectacular – half a mile outside of Tintagel, across rugged clifftops, with no vehicular access. Tintagel Island, attached to the mainland by a sliver of land, enhances the wild and romantic atmosphere.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

David Brear October 2015

Take your time

Leave unsteady members of the family at the café while more active members tackle the many uneven, high, sometimes slippery steps (handrails are provided - use them!). Enjoy the excellent information centre which uses an innovative overhead projector to show the succeeding occupations of the site. There is a café and toilets, and a Land Rover to run you down and back if the walk down the valley isn't for you.
This is a uniquely precious historical site, the first to show how dark age Britain was actually still firmly connected to Mediterranean civilisation. Its legendary connection to king Arthur led to the construction of the Norman castle, but don't let the historical fiction mislead you - this is a real site where hundreds of people lived and traded for centuries at the edge of the Atlantic long before the Saxons took over Cornwall. The dramatic cliffs, the birds, the butterflies will all make this a day to remember.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

February 2014

Worth the climb!

A visit to Tintagel is a must when visiting this part of the world! The Castle has breathtaking views,but is a steep climb up to the top. The village has lots of friendly gift shops and good pubs to choose from.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

April 2012

Awesome. A must see and you can even take your dog up the cliffs and around the ruins.
Thank you English Heritage.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Harding April 2012

Nice but you must be fit

This is a lovely old ruin split between 2 cliffs. To access both involve very steep steps. You must be very fit but its a nice day out.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Lansley October 2011

Tintagel and Trebarwith Strand

Although we stayed an hour away it was really worth the visit. My second visit in 10 years and so nice to see nothing had changed. Extremely steep slopes to climb - good steps and rails to hang on to but no access for wheelchairs or disabled! You must go on a good sunny day to take advantage of the views around. Always windy and blowy there.

Trebarwith Strand is just around the corner and is so worth the visit as the rock formation to get the beach is really worth seeing. Very natural but again no real access for wheelchairs or disabled really.

The Rising Sun (4 ¾ miles)

A 16th century inn a couple of miles from Altarnun, The Rising Sun is a great single-room pub with slate floors and an old oak bar worn smooth by years of resting elbows. Known locally for excellent food served in the bar or restaurant, there is a great selection of real ales, mouth-watering food and a welcoming atmosphere.

Rated 4 out of 5 stars
Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Ms Gulliford April 2011

Lovely old pub, open fire, slate floors and warm welcome. Lots of good food, locally sourced and cooked with style. Eat filling snacks in the bar or splash out on the full three courses in the restaurant. Also does an excellent Sunday lunch.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

April 2009

This is a really nice, tucked away pub. As well as the main atmospheric pub area, there is a newly refurbished restaurant area, which is more modern in design and nice and spacious. The food is lovely, reasonably priced and the service is friendly and good. Lots of nice fish dishes on the specials board!


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

November 2008

The food is fantastic very good value for money.

Tregida Smokehouse (70 yards)

This family run business produces traditional Cornish Oak smoked fish, meat and game, which you will find in many a well-known eating establishment in the area, including Rick Stein's delicatessan and Jamie Oliver's Fifteen restaurant. They also have a wide selection of produce available to order online.

Crackington Haven (4 ¾ miles)

Near to Bude, Crackington Haven is a little village nestled in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Once famous for importing coal from Wales, the village’s beach is now a firm family-favourite for long days spent flicking between sea and sand. Surrounded by high cliffs and beautiful countryside, Crackington Haven offers a scenic escape.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Wood September 2014

A wonderful day on the beach

A quiet, secluded and sheltered beach. Not very busy, but very lovely. There is a car park and a very short stroll onto the beach. The beach is pebbley/rocky. It is sheltered due to the headlands. We sat and read, soaked up the sunshine, had a paddle in the sea and took photos. A short walk enabled us to get a takeaway cup of tea to bring back to the beach. Perfect!

The Napoleon Inn (5 ½ miles)

A traditional, low-beamed 16th Century inn where children and dogs are welcome.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Miss Gowshall October 2016

Excellent food and service, cozy pub.

The food was exceptional and extremely fresh, I had the stew and my partner had the mackerel (both from the specials menu), both dishes were delicious accompanied by fresh vegetables and salad respectively.
Well worth a visit and booking is advisable, we went on Thurday night and the majority of tables were already booked, luckily for us we were able to grab a table.
The service was both professional and personal without being over attentive, really good staff.
The beer was poured from an old style stillage which was in fitting with the tradition of the building and tasted excellent.
A great find and well worth at least 1 visit!

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