The sitting-area is very comfortable and as you can see the view is right there through the French doors.
Praxis is right in the heart of Trebarwith Strand.
The view is amazing and at low tide the beach stretches for a mile.
The coastline is quite stunning and you may well catch your breath as you drive down into the valley.
In this image you can see the little balcony where viewing the comings and goings of Trebarwith will be great fun.
The dining-area will offer you a front row seat to watch the people on the beach.
Charming touches throughout.
The Fort William is just up the road and ideal for an early sundowner.
The view is fantastic and in the evening the beach and hamlet will be yours to enjoy.
The French doors lead out to the patio where you will have a seagull's view of the beach.
The bedroom boasts a lovely brass bed.
The brass bed is in-keeping with the style of the cottage.
The bespoke kitchen is small but perfectly functional.
A view from the kitchen-area towards the sitting-area.
Trebarwith Strand.
The charming fishing village of Port Isaac is not too far away to visit.
The north coast of Cornwall is famous for its spectacular sunsets.

Praxis

2854

4.4 miles SW of Boscastle / Sleeps 2 (no children under 12)

7 Nights from £532 - £1329

Nearest pub

The Port William Inn (250 yards)

In a stunning setting, this pub offers wonderful views over Trebarwith Strand, excellent food and fine Cornish ales. A popular place for walkers, there is also a surf school nearby.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Young October 2013

A real gem.

We stumbled across the Port William at Trebarwith Strand one evening on our way back from Port Issac. When we arrived the sun was setting, the tide was high and the waves roaring! The pub sits on part of the cliff which looks over the bay of Trebarwith, offering stunning views of this part of the coastline. We had a drink whilst sat on one of the picnic benches outside and watched the sunset. Bliss! We then returned to the Port William for lunch later in our holiday and the food was very tasty 'pub grub'. The staff were very welcoming and the pub is child and dog friendly and our two sons enjoyed looking at the huge fish tank that resides in the main bar!


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

The Ward Family May 2013

An exceptional place to watch the sun set over Trebarwith Strand either with a pint of fine Cornish ale, glass of wine or a robust pub feast. Great food and a recently added contemporary extension to the dining area with outstanding sea views.

Nearest beach

Trebarwith Strand Beach (200 yards)

Truly beautiful when the tide is out. Just 5 minutes from Tintagel and good for bass fishing too.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Warrington May 2015

Trebarwith Strand

We walked along the cliff tops to discover this beautiful stretch of dog friendly beach. It is accessed by a rocky plateau but once on the beach there is a long stretch of golden sand with plenty of room for all to play. Lots of body boarding & surfing to be had with places to hire equipment. It's a lovely unspoilt area with a couple of cafes, tourist shops & a pub. Definitely worth a visit.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Wood September 2014

Fantastic beach

We were recommended Trebarwith Strand as one of the nicest beaches along this stretch of coastline. It was beautiful. We visited at lowtide, so lots of sandy beach available. The entry onto the beach is past a few cafes (we had an amazing cream tea in one of them = yum) and over a rocky area, before you reach the sand. The rocks themselves are fascinating. The beach is a good size, with rock pools and caves and plenty for all to explore. Some of the roads approaching Trebarwith are steep and narrow - as is often in this part of Cornwall.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

February 2014

Hidden Gem!

Found the beach by accident whilst staying at Port Isaac and visiting Tintagel.
Beautiful sandy beach,reached by clambering over rocks . Really nice Cafe serving burgers and chips etc. Wish we had time to return another day!

The Melia Family


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

The Ward Family January 2013

An absolute classic!

Trebarwith Strand lies at the end of a narrow lane that descends through a wooded valley to this beachside hamlet. A vast beach at Spring low tides, its only downside is at high tide it is reduced to a modest rocky plateau. Armed with a tide table, however, there is no excuse for at least 6 hours a day on this deeply charismatic beach. Surrounded by an impressive cliff-scape this beach offers caves, huge sand flats, streams and rock pools big enough for the kids to safely swim in. Great surf as well including surf hire and lessons.When the tide does gently nudge the family up onto the rocky plateau, lovely in its own right, there is always the Port William pub overlooking the beach or a variety of cafes and a couple of quirky gift shops to keep everyone entertained. This is also a great place to access the coastal path heading North East to Penhallic point and Tintagel castle or South West to Tregardock beach and Port Isaac. It can get busy in the high season but never on the Polzeath scale and out of season it is usually very peaceful.

Nearest walk

Tintagel and the Rocky Valley (1 ¼ miles)

Initially heading inland from Tintagel Vistor Centre to magical St Nectan's Glen, through Rocky Valley and then along the coast to Tintagel Castle. The views of the coastline throughout this walk are spectacular. Along the way you’ll come across a ruined village and Bronze Age carvings. It's around six miles at a moderate grading.

Nearest town

Tintagel (1 ½ miles)

Tintagel, legendary home of King Arthur and the knights of the round table. On Tintagel Head the atmospheric ruins of the 12th Century castle command spectacular views up and down the rugged north coast of Cornwall. Take a few days to explore the surrounding area, which is steeped in Arthurian myth.

Rated 4 out of 5 stars
Rated 4 out of 5 stars

April 2012

If you visit Tintagel try the Wooton Hotel for a superb Sunday carvery lunch you will not be let down

Also nearby

Tintagel Castle (1 ¼ miles)

The remains of Tintagel Castle are at the heart of Arthurian legend. The location of the castle is spectacular – half a mile outside of Tintagel, across rugged clifftops, with no vehicular access. Tintagel Island, attached to the mainland by a sliver of land, enhances the wild and romantic atmosphere.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

David Brear October 2015

Take your time

Leave unsteady members of the family at the café while more active members tackle the many uneven, high, sometimes slippery steps (handrails are provided - use them!). Enjoy the excellent information centre which uses an innovative overhead projector to show the succeeding occupations of the site. There is a café and toilets, and a Land Rover to run you down and back if the walk down the valley isn't for you.
This is a uniquely precious historical site, the first to show how dark age Britain was actually still firmly connected to Mediterranean civilisation. Its legendary connection to king Arthur led to the construction of the Norman castle, but don't let the historical fiction mislead you - this is a real site where hundreds of people lived and traded for centuries at the edge of the Atlantic long before the Saxons took over Cornwall. The dramatic cliffs, the birds, the butterflies will all make this a day to remember.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

February 2014

Worth the climb!

A visit to Tintagel is a must when visiting this part of the world! The Castle has breathtaking views,but is a steep climb up to the top. The village has lots of friendly gift shops and good pubs to choose from.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

April 2012

Awesome. A must see and you can even take your dog up the cliffs and around the ruins.
Thank you English Heritage.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Harding April 2012

Nice but you must be fit

This is a lovely old ruin split between 2 cliffs. To access both involve very steep steps. You must be very fit but its a nice day out.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Lansley October 2011

Tintagel and Trebarwith Strand

Although we stayed an hour away it was really worth the visit. My second visit in 10 years and so nice to see nothing had changed. Extremely steep slopes to climb - good steps and rails to hang on to but no access for wheelchairs or disabled! You must go on a good sunny day to take advantage of the views around. Always windy and blowy there.

Trebarwith Strand is just around the corner and is so worth the visit as the rock formation to get the beach is really worth seeing. Very natural but again no real access for wheelchairs or disabled really.

The Mill House Inn (½ mile)

Simple but perfectly executed classic dishes.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

May 2013

This delightful converted traditional mill house offers the best of both worlds: an excellent pint of Cornish Ale in a worn leather armchair, maybe a live band, maybe a fire in the hearth...then next door a crisp gastro-pub style fine dining experience all within a stones throw from the fabulous Trebarwith strand.

Port Isaac (4 ¾ miles)

You might well recognise some of Port Isaac’s winding lanes and its harbour; the port has long been a star of both the big and small screens, most notably in ‘Doc Martin’ and ‘Saving Grace’. This is Cornwall at its most quaint with streets so steep and narrow that in many places cars simply don’t fit. For a great meal of fresh fish landed at Port Isaac’s harbour, the Edge Restaurant is a brilliant choice and somehow those panoramic views out to sea from the tables add to the flavour.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Mitchell September 2012

Just like it is on the telly!!

Port Isaac is truey lovely to visit whether you are aware of the Doc Martin show or not, but if you love the show a visit here is a must!


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Mann June 2009

Doc Martin Filming in Port Isaac

They are presently filming a new series of Doc Martin in Port Isaac so keep your eyes open for Martin Clunes and the rest of the cast and crew. And when you get home it's great fun to spot the scenes you saw being filmed!

Tregardock Beach (1 ½ miles)

The visually arresting Tregardock beach is found between Tintagel and Port Isaac. Often quiet due its fairly challenging access route, this beach is an adventure playground. With soaring cliffs and an expanse of sand unfolding at low tide, there is an abundance of rocky crevices, caves and even a waterfall to seize your attention - just keep an eye on the tide.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

The Ward Family January 2013

Rugged beauty

Tregardock beach is a real treat. This raw and breathtaking hidden gem is off the beaten track but well worth the 15min walk in from the blind ended lane to Trgardock farm, (limited lane-side parking). The final descent is steep and rocky and for the sure footed only. Once down on the sand the intrepid beach explorer is treated with great sandy expanses, a vast array of caves and rock pools, (some deep enough for the kids to swim in), and a spectacular waterfall at the Eastern end, (if it's not running don't complain as you are clearly having some pretty good dry weather!) Access 2-3 hrs either side of LOW water only. Trerubies cove, with a real smugglers flavour, lies to the West and usually involves a scramble. If exploring this far be vigilant about the incoming tide and aim to retreat nearer the exit point once the tide has turned to come in. Tregardock can also be accessed from the neighbouring village of Treligga or from the coastal path.

St Kew Pottery (5 ¾ miles)

Feeling artistic? Try your hand at some pottery, still life or life drawing classes with potter Jon Whitten. Jon, whose work can be found in collections in Europe, Japan, New Zealand and the US, specialises in contemporary, wheel thrown pottery, a large collection of which is on display here, and is available to buy.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

September 2017

If the weather is not so good!

I should have said whether the weather is good or bad an interesting couple of hours learning the art of pottery with your host Jon. Can even take your works of art (or otherwise!) back home with you. Thank you, Jon.

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