Park House.
Park House sits within a large enclosed garden.
The sitting-room is beautifully furnished and has a lovely open fire.
Over the fields you can see the sea in the distance.
The sitting-room opposite the fire.
The sunny and bright kitchen/breakfast-room.
Park House has plenty of room.
The garden is very spacious and sunny all day long.
The lovely light double bedroom.
The twin bedroom with beautiful crisp white bed linen has views out across the surrounding countryside.
The sun-room is very cosy.
Park House is detached and very private.
The view out across the open fields which surround Park House.
Polzeath beach is just down the road from Park House.
Polzeath beach has lots of cafes, surfing schools and shops!
Padstow harbour.

Park House

2393

1.6 miles NE of Rock / Sleeps 8 + cot

7 Nights from £573 - £1569

Nearest pub

The Mariners (2 miles)

Located overlooking the Camel Estuary and open for lunch and dinner. Reservations are required to dine upstairs but you can walk in and eat downstairs or outside.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Kew October 2017

The Mariners

Excellent menu & food.Friendly helpful staff

Nearest beach

Epphaven Beach (1 ½ miles)

There is excellent cliff walking in this area. The sheltered sand and rock cove is best visited at low tide. Lundy Hole, a collapsed sea cave, is to the west of the beach.

Nearest walk

Port Quin to Port Isaac (2 miles)

If you are feeling adventurous take the route that follows the coastal path and benefit from the stunning view you will be surrounded by. Alternatively there is an inland walk which is equally attractive but less energetic and brings you to the same location.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Smith June 2012

A superb walk, but it is strenuous, with lots of energy-sapping steps. Views from the cliffs are superb and we were lucky enough to see dolphins just below.
It's probably best to do the walk anti-clockwise. Park in the NT car park at Port Quin, turn right on the road out of the car park and after about 200m take the footpath on the left, next to some cottages. The path across the fields is easy, except for one short sharp climb near Port Isaac. Return via the coast path - twice the distance and 10 times the effort. Wear good shoes and take water if the weather is hot.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Baker September 2011

A beauitful coastal walk from Port Quin to Port Isaac about 6 miles, the coast line just takes your breath away. Then arriving at Port Isaac for a well deserved Ice Cream on the beach. The walk back was done in half the time with finding the shorter walk over fields which was just as pretty.

Nearest town

Rock (1 mile)

On the Camel Estuary across the water from Padstow, Rock's sheltered position makes it ideal for sailing, fishing and canoeing. At low tide the fine sandy beach stretches for two miles to Daymer Bay. It's easy to see why Rock is such a popular holiday destination with the affluent London set.

Also nearby

Port Isaac (3 ¼ miles)

You might well recognise some of Port Isaac’s winding lanes and its harbour; the port has long been a star of both the big and small screens, most notably in ‘Doc Martin’ and ‘Saving Grace’. This is Cornwall at its most quaint with streets so steep and narrow that in many places cars simply don’t fit. For a great meal of fresh fish landed at Port Isaac’s harbour, the Edge Restaurant is a brilliant choice and somehow those panoramic views out to sea from the tables add to the flavour.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Mitchell September 2012

Just like it is on the telly!!

Port Isaac is truey lovely to visit whether you are aware of the Doc Martin show or not, but if you love the show a visit here is a must!


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mr Mann June 2009

Doc Martin Filming in Port Isaac

They are presently filming a new series of Doc Martin in Port Isaac so keep your eyes open for Martin Clunes and the rest of the cast and crew. And when you get home it's great fun to spot the scenes you saw being filmed!

Polzeath Beach (1 ¾ miles)

Park right on the beach (be careful of the tides), stumble out of the car - and you’re on one of Cornwall’s finest surfing beaches. Shops, ice cream parlours and cafes tumble haphazardly towards the beach.

Rated 4 out of 5 stars
Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Mrs Styles August 2013

Excellent beach. Watch the tides if you have younger children as when the tide is out there are lots of rock pools and safe , warm lagoons to explore! Great waves for body boarding.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

September 2012

Great for families and surfers, but not my cup of my tea at all. Too busy and difficult for non-surfers to swim.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Mrs Barr July 2011

Sandy Beach, wonderful for young and old alike

This beach is fantastic, we have been to many beaches throughout Cornwall and found this beach one of the best. It is perfect for young children (we have 3), nice sandy beach with lots of little rock pools over by the rocks to explore and for the kids to have fun. A surfers haven, my father and oldest boy took up surfing here and loved it. There are shops, toilets and places for food and drink a few moments walk away but it is not over crowded. Easy access for elderly and disabled too. A real holiday feel. Well worth a visit.


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Mrs Llewellyn-Smith July 2011

A Great Beach for Children, Dogs & Surfers

Not only a beautiful spot, but a fantastic beach for children. The rock pools that form around the edges of the bay create warm pools that are great for exploring & wallowing.
Just wrap up warm as the wind is always a bit more prominent here - hence the great surfing opportunities!


Rated 4 out of 5 stars

Mr Mann June 2009

The essence of the seaside

The most perfect beach. A deep sandy bay fringed by rocks on each side. When the tide is out it leaves large shallow pools of water that are lovely for children. Also a surfing magnet.

The Camel Trail (3 miles)

The Camel Trail is a 19 mile route that follows the beautiful Camel River from Padstow, where it joins the sea in a wide estuary, to Poley’s Bridge inland, where it is merely a stream running through woodland. En-route at Nanstallon you will also find the Camel Trail Tea Rooms. Bikes are for hire from either Padstow or Wadebridge and it's a brilliant area for bird watching. Visit Wenfordbridge in spring and delight in the profusion of daffodils, snowdrops and primroses.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Ms Simmonds April 2012

Wadebridge to Padstow

The Wadebridge to Padstow section of the trail is about 6 miles. Whilst you can hire bikes easily in Wadebridge the largely flat walk, which would be possible with a pushchair, makes a lovely walk. New views open up as the Camel twists and turns and the slower pace means you can spot the wildlife en route. Set off after breakfast and you will be in Padstow for lunch. A bus to Wadebrdge leaves Padstow from the old railway station on the half hour and will take you back in about 20 minutes.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

August 2011

Wonderful off road cycling venue, undisturbed with beautiful views and mostly flat easy cycling.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Cliff August 2011

Tranquil Trail

The four mile Helland to Bodmin section of the Camel Trail is much quieter than the Wadebridge to Padstow section. Park for free at Helland and follow the trail through peaceful woodland catching tantalising glimpses of the river through the canopy of trees. Wildlife abounds in this tranquil spot. Before leaving Helland go and have a look at the medieval Helland Bridge which spans the upper reaches of the River Camel.


Rated 5 out of 5 stars

Mrs Higgs August 2008

The Camel Trail

The trail is best explored from the Pooley Bridge end which is just 2 1/2 miles from daydream cottage. Shell woods are great in the autumn and cool and shaded during the summer. Wonderful for picnics by the fast flowing river.

St Kew Pottery (3 ½ miles)

Feeling artistic? Try your hand at some pottery, still life or life drawing classes with potter Jon Whitten. Jon, whose work can be found in collections in Europe, Japan, New Zealand and the US, specialises in contemporary, wheel thrown pottery, a large collection of which is on display here, and is available to buy.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

September 2017

If the weather is not so good!

I should have said whether the weather is good or bad an interesting couple of hours learning the art of pottery with your host Jon. Can even take your works of art (or otherwise!) back home with you. Thank you, Jon.

Camel Ski School (½ mile)

Water skiing and wakeboarding lessons, plus Banana boat rides in the beautiful Camel estuary.

Rated 5 out of 5 stars
Rated 5 out of 5 stars

February 2009

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