Places to Go

The crown of The Jurassic Coast

During the summer, you’re lucky if you can find a parking space, as Lulworth is literally teeming with cars, people and dogs, the tourist accommodation is completely full and ice cream shop queues stretch as far as the eye can see.

It’s not surprising that Lulworth is so popular; the picture postcard icon of Durdle Door stands majestically beside the thrashing waves and the 1.8 mile walk from Lulworth to this fascinating geological structure is not for the faint hearted. Thankfully, there are numerous places to purchase ice cream, which of course is always well deserved after the effort of walking to absorb so much beautiful scenery...no wonder the queues are always so long!

It would be easy to think that the charm of Lulworth only draws people in over the summer, for kayaking, boating, dog walking and just having a picnic by the sea. For me though, the beauty is still there even in winter, when the crowds have died down and there is a crisp chill in the air as you look out over the sea as far as Portland and beyond. You will definitely find a parking space at this time of the year...and there definitely won’t be a queue for the ice cream!

Lulworth beach is popular

The Heritage Centre situated by the main car park offers an enhancement to your trip to Lulworth - showing the development of the cove over time and how the iconic features like Durdle Door and The Stair Hole were carved into existence. Additionally, several videos of extreme weather across the Jurassic Coast over the past few decades show the pure power of the ocean and the elements, and the effect that this has had on the cove and the way we see it today.

A drawback to Lulworth is the fact that the beaches to the east of the cove are only open weekends and not during August, as they lie on land used by the military. The beaches to the west coast however are open all year round, for anyone fancying a brisk winter walk or to simply drive by and watch the world go by as the sun goes down over the cove.

The cove was featured on the TV programme ‘Seven Natural Wonders’ as one of the wonders of southern England, and it is this increasingly famous profile that helps to sustain its average annual visitor number of 500,000, most of whom visit in July and August.

In 2001 the coast was granted World Heritage Site status by UNESCO, and experts at UNESCO are working on preserving the shape of Lulworth Cove. So, all in all it's a pretty spectacular place to be; I thoroughly recommend a stay near Lulworth Cove.

Lulworth Cove

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